Tag Archives: Mormon Literature

On Mormon Alternate History Stories

Last year, William Morris announced on A Motley Vision that he would be putting together an anthology of Mormon alternate history stories. As William explained in his first post on the subject, Mormon writers seem to be turning to alternate … Continue reading

Posted in Mormon LitCrit | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Moving Culture

At this year’s Association for Mormon Letters conference I had the opportunity to participate in a panel discussion on teaching Mormon literature with Margaret Blair Young, Shelah Miner, and Boyd Petersen. Among the items we discussed at length was the … Continue reading

Posted in Mormon LitCrit, Storytelling and Community | Tagged , , | 20 Comments

Guest Post: An Illustrated Definition of Mormon Literature

I’ve been busy these past few days, so I decided to pass my monthly post on to someone with a little more time. You might recognize her as Enid Gardner, the star MIA Maniac of the webcomic The Garden of Enid. Aside … Continue reading

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Incidentally Mormon Literature

Some literature is Mormon to the bones. This includes — maybe is identical to — literature that is to some important extent about the experience of being Mormon. The story turns out the way it does partly because the main … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, Mormon LitCrit, The Writer's Desk | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Digital Drama: The Way to Keep Mormon Theatre Relevant?

I believe that keeping the flame of Mormon drama alive is important. Especially at our still early stage of development as a religion and a culture, we already have a rich heritage of dramatic literature filled with a wide range … Continue reading

Posted in Announcements, Business Side of Writing, Electronic Age, On-screen, On-stage, Storytelling and Community | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Mormon Literature and the Anxiety of “Passing”

In literature, a character’s ability to move unnoticed from one social group to another, often more privileged group is called “passing.” In Disney’s Mulan, for example, the title character “passes” for a man so that she can take her aging … Continue reading

Posted in Mormon LitCrit, Storytelling and Community | Tagged , , , , , , , | 15 Comments