Category Archives: Mormon LitCrit

An Interview with Johnny Townsend

by Gerald S. Argetsinger Gerald Argetsinger is an Associate Professor in the Department of Cultural and Creative Studies, Rochester Institute of Technology. He has published extensively on Scandinavian Theatre, dramatic literature, and magic. He also founder of the Gay Mormon … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, Mormon LitCrit, The Writer's Desk | Tagged , , , , , | 10 Comments

Mormon LitCrit: From Imitation to Innovation; or, Why Mormon Writers Should Move Out of the Basement

Cultural texts do not exist independent of one another, but in an interdependent relationship we call the tradition. New texts rely on the tradition of older texts, and older texts depend on new texts to keep the tradition vibrant and relevant. … Continue reading

Posted in Mormon LitCrit | Tagged , , , , | 111 Comments

Mormon Culture and Les Miserables

Everywhere I go, people are talking about this. Yep, that’s right. Les Miserables! The Movie! This Christmas! Oh!  My!  Heck! But here’s a confession: I don’t care. Not even a bit.

Posted in Mormon LitCrit, On-screen, Storytelling and Community | Tagged | 15 Comments

Mormon Literature and the Anxiety of “Passing”

In literature, a character’s ability to move unnoticed from one social group to another, often more privileged group is called “passing.” In Disney’s Mulan, for example, the title character “passes” for a man so that she can take her aging … Continue reading

Posted in Mormon LitCrit, Storytelling and Community | Tagged , , , , , , , | 15 Comments

Four Centuries Contest Discussion: “Little Karl”

The first finalist in Everyday Mormon Writer‘s “Four Centuries of Mormon Stories” contest is Melissa Leilani Larson’s “Little Karl,”which is based on real events in Larson’s family history. Because the stories are relatively short and publicly accessible, this contest gives … Continue reading

Posted in Electronic Age, Mormon LitCrit | Tagged , , | 19 Comments

Literature and the Challenge of The Mormon People

Matthew Bowman’s The Mormon People: The Making of an American Faith, published earlier this year by Random House, is possibly the best overview of Mormon history that I’ve read. Written for scholars and general readers alike, the book situates Mormonism … Continue reading

Posted in Mormon LitCrit | Tagged , , , , | 12 Comments

The Mystery of the Muse

The guest post today was provided by the talented author, J. Lloyd Morgan. He shares his thoughts on a great creative topic–the muse–which I’ve often found must be treated gently. Mine at times requires chocolate.   The Mystery of the … Continue reading

Posted in Mormon LitCrit, Mysterious Doings, The Writer's Desk | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

In Defense of Grumpiness: A Review of “Brothers,” “Quietly,” and A Roof Overhead

Update 18 Aug 2012: In the comments, Mahonri Stewart responds to my critiques of his piece. In the interest of fairness, I encourage anyone who reads this review to also take a look at his comments. I happen to agree … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, Mormon LitCrit | Tagged , , , , , , | 43 Comments

Mormon Characters in Mormon Literature

I recently finished reading THE SCHOLAR OF MOAB, by Steven L. Peck, which received the AML Novel Award for last year, and I want to say, first of all, that the writing in this book is wonderful. The characters are … Continue reading

Posted in Mormon LitCrit, Storytelling and Community | Tagged | 37 Comments

Agency, Influence, Accountability, and the Mormon Artist

Since last Friday’s mass-shooting at a midnight premiere of The Dark Knight Rises, fingers have pointed in many directions. In a New York Times op-ed, for example, film critic Roger Ebert joins others in blaming the gun lobby and “paranoid … Continue reading

Posted in Mormon LitCrit, The Writer's Desk | Tagged , , | 80 Comments