Category Archives: SF&F corner

Interview with Charlie Holmberg

2015 seems a good time to introduce a new fantasy series and probably a new-to-you LDS author: Charlie N. Holmberg, a student of Brandon Sanderson and BYU graduate (2010), who has written the Paper Magician series, published by 47North. The … Continue reading

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“The Shining Dream Road Out,” by M. Shayne Bell

Recently, I bought a copy of How We Play the Game in Salt Lake and Other Stories, a collection of short(ish) fiction by M. Shayne Bell. I’ve been reading at it since, and eventually plan to write and post a … Continue reading

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Random Bits: Hugo Nominations, The Expanse TV Series, “Whaliens”

Hugo Nominations The Hugo Award nominations came out a couple of weeks ago, and Andrew Hall has already listed the LDS nominees.  But I’d like to give a bit more context to some of the controversies. The Hugos are nominated … Continue reading

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Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson

Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson debuted at #1 on the New York Times Best Seller list for hardcover fiction and #2 on the overall USA Today list.  It’s the second book in his Stormlight Archives series, which began with … Continue reading

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Parallel Earths

I recently read An Island in the Sea of Time by S. M. Stirling, in which the entire island of Nantucket from 1998 A.D. mysteriously ends up in around 1250 B.C.  It reminded me quite a bit of Eric Flint’s … Continue reading

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Mormon Enough? I’m Relieved to Discover…

I believe the tendency to reduce and exclude, to narrow definitions to simple, direct memes has its uses. In criticizing literature by Mormons or for Mormon audiences, Mormon critics must necessarily categorize and differentiate which shelves should carry which stories. Readers deserve to know.

But I think we do ourselves a disservice if we dismiss as irrelevant those works by self-described Mormon authors that are not told in culturally Mormon forms and terms. Because it is precisely these subconsciously Mormon tales that can reveal deep Mormonism to those audiences most capable of understanding those themes. Not better than more overt tales, but just as deserving of our thoughtful criticism. It would be a shame to institutionally dismiss what could be some of our most deeply Mormon works because that Mormonness was not obvious enough. Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, Mormon LitCrit, SF&F corner, The Populist's Soapbox | 4 Comments