Category Archives: The Past through Literature

The Book of Mormon: a Biography

One of my favorite books of Bible scholarship, and a terrific dip-your-toes-in-the-water first book for people interested in the subject is Karen Armstrong’s The Bible: A Biography.  It was part of a series called Books That Changed the World, and … Continue reading

Posted in Literary Views of Scripture, On-screen, On-stage, The Past through Literature | 2 Comments

Writing the Hard History

I have posted this elsewhere in the past, but with the publication of The Fading Flower by Zarahemla Books recently, and that play being more readily available now, I wanted to drag this post back into the light: I have … Continue reading

Posted in On-stage, The Past through Literature, The Writer's Desk | 10 Comments

in verse # 18 : a monstrous fable

Like many a medieval manuscript, Piers the plowman has no title as such.  Walter W. Skeat, who gave it that title, notes, however, that, in the manuscript he used as the basis for his Oxford edition, “we find here [in … Continue reading

Posted in In Verse, Mormon LitCrit, The Past through Literature | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

History as Fiction, Fiction as History

A few weeks ago, A Motley Vision provided a quote from an 1897 publication by Junius Wells in which he discusses the idea of books as ‘companions’ and urges his readers to reconsider the type of company they keep when … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, The Past through Literature | Tagged , , | 22 Comments

Children’s Lit Corner

I have been haunted most of my life by the memory of a book I read once when I was very young. It was most likely a library book, because it certainly wasn’t part of my life for very long, … Continue reading

Posted in Children's Lit corner, Storytelling and Community, The Past through Literature, YA corner | 7 Comments

in verse # 14 : the alliterative revival

Literary wayfaring in England did not end with the Norman Conquest in 1066.  It forked, one fork following the lead of the French conquerors, the other the lead of the English conquered.  Both of these were excursions into vulgar territory

Posted in In Verse, The Past through Literature, Thoughts on Language | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments