Author Archives: Jack Harrell

From the Writer’s Desk: The Breath? Really?

Recently I read a book by Laraine Herring called Writing Begins with the Breath. Herring’s thesis is that writing doesn’t only come from the writer’s intellect, but from the writer’s whole being. According to Herring, the physical space around the … Continue reading

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From the Writer’s Desk: Writing that is “Implicitly Philosophical”

I’ve written before about my appreciation for John Gardner, a novelist who also wrote the books On Moral Fiction and The Art of Fiction. (I recommend both of these to anyone who’s serious about fiction writing.) One of Gardner’s most … Continue reading

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From the Writer’s Desk: Making Time to Write

Where does one find the time to write? Where do Mormons find the time to write? Over the years I’ve heard Mormons complain about this. The complaint usually goes like this: “I’d have a great novel to my credit if … Continue reading

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The Writer’s Desk: Writing Epiphanies

Novelist Charles Baxter’s book Burning Down the House: Essays on Fiction is a must-read for anyone interested in the art of fiction writing. One of the most evocative essays in the book is called “Against Epiphanies.” Though Baxter is critiquing … Continue reading

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Mormon LitCrit: Public and Private Selves in Fiction

The latest issue of Irreantum features a fine essay by Doug Thayer entitled “About Serious Mormon Fiction.” One statement from Thayer moved me to think about the sources of fiction that might grow out of the Mormon experience. Thayer says … Continue reading

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Mormon LitCrit: Postmodernism and the Mormon Writer

Do you know the Brief Insights series of books? It’s similar to the Very Short Introductions series, in which a broad topic is covered in one concise, well-written volume. The many titles are as far-ranging as Kafka, Music, Existentialism, Literary … Continue reading

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