Tag Archives: Nephi Anderson

Thankful for five

. ‘Tis the time of year we engage in exercises of our gratitudinal capacity. I though I would share five books that have shaped my conceptions of Mormon literature for the better. I encourage you to share your own beloved … Continue reading

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AML Book Club: August with Anderson Discussion

Nephi Anderson’s Added Upon lost its first round August Insanity match-up against Louisa Perkins’ Dispirited, but we’re not going to let that get in the way of a spirited discussion about two of his later work, Piney Ridge Cottage and The Story of Chester Lawrence. As I mentioned in … Continue reading

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AML Book Club: An August with Anderson

Recently, Jonathan Langford has been throwing around the idea of hosting an AML book club here at Dawning of a Brighter Day. Since I like the idea, I propose we inaugurate the club with a reading of two classic Mormon … Continue reading

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Nephi Anderson at the Annual SASS Conference

Next week, the Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Studies will be holding its annual conference in San Francisco. For this year’s conference, a few of us have put together a panel on Nephi Anderson that focuses on his Scandinavian … Continue reading

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Five Nephi Anderson Novels You Should Read Before You Die

This week I plan to finish my dissertation chapter on Nephi Anderson’s novels. As the current draft climbs to around 65 pages, I realize that trying to encapsulate Anderson’s contribution to Mormon letters in one chapter is a fool’s errand. … Continue reading

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Mormon Literature and the Anxiety of “Passing”

In literature, a character’s ability to move unnoticed from one social group to another, often more privileged group is called “passing.” In Disney’s Mulan, for example, the title character “passes” for a man so that she can take her aging … Continue reading

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