Tag Archives: Blogging

Book Reviews on the Internet: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Recently, a discussion cropped up in the comments section on a book review posted on another blog. The commenter noted that both the person reviewing the book, along with the other commenters, were generally heaping praise on the book while … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, Electronic Age, Mormon LitCrit | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Wanted: One Internet-free Dark Night of the Soul

At a Sunstone Symposium a few years ago, I was talking with a person who ran a popular podcast. She mentioned that one of her hopes was that the podcast would help people to feel not so alone when they … Continue reading

Posted in Personal Narratives | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

The Why and the How of Book Reviews

For this month’s post, I invited Tristi Pinkston, AML’s new book reviewer, to share her talents with us. Tristi has a great eye for books, and her opinions are a great guide to go by when selecting books to add … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, Mormon LitCrit, Mysterious Doings | Tagged , , | 10 Comments

Searching for Good (Oh!); or At Least Good Enough

With the advent of the Internet, digital media, and extraordinary personal technology I now have more access to more titles across more categories and genres and viewpoints than ever before. More people can produce, and more people can consume without the prohibitive barriers to entry that kept small and independent voices from entering the market.

It should be nirvana for someone like me, but that’s not quite how it’s worked out. It turns out there are too many titles, too many authors, and too many voices to get a real handle on the vast diversity available. It’s hard to find a particular thing. Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, Electronic Age | Tagged , , , , | 11 Comments

Speaking Out vs. Being Heard

This tension between the rhetorical (one-shot testifying) and the dialectic (extended argument intended to discover new conclusions) is at least as old as the ancient Greeks and has been a staple of academic consideration from the beginning.

The problem is that market forces are not conducive to extended conversations. If your last book sells you get a shot at the next one; otherwise, you’re out of luck and looking for a new publisher. The mechanics of markets tend to push more toward the rhetorical extreme—you have to make the biggest splash you can and deliver the entire conceptual payload in a single go. Continue reading

Posted in Electronic Age, Mormon LitCrit, Storytelling and Community | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Mormons, Masks, and Mommy Blogs

By now, you’ve probably seen Emily Matchar’s article “Why I can’t stop reading Mormon housewife blogs.” (Her tagline: “I’m a young feminist atheist who can’t bake a cupcake. Why am I addicted to the shiny, happy lives of these women?”) … Continue reading

Posted in Storytelling and Community, The Writer's Desk | Tagged , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Announcement: AML Blog Facelift

AML blog will be getting a new look and feel, thanks to efforts by Jacob Proffitt and Johnna Cornett — including a switch to WordPress as our new platform. It’s our hope that this will make the blog function more … Continue reading

Posted in Announcements | Tagged , | 7 Comments

Electronic Age: The interwhatsis, and the future of literature

Let’s face it: the internet has us all freaked out.  It’s 1439 all over again–maybe more like 1450–and this Gutenberg dude has just revolutionized the way information is disseminated and all we know for sure is that those monks who … Continue reading

Posted in Electronic Age, Funny Stuff | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments