Category Archives: In Verse

in verse #43 : hero’s journey

When Leonard Cohen said “Poetry is just the evidence of life. If your life is burning well, poetry is just the ash,”[i] he probably didn’t have Joseph Smith in mind. Joseph Smith burned brightly in a world lit only by … Continue reading

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in verse #42 : Art is God

A stake president once took me aside, a week or so after a stake conference, and in his own gruff but loving way, asked me a few questions. He had led me into the High-Council room, and then asked me … Continue reading

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in verse #40 : owed to Keats

Have you ever wanted to correct a classic of literature? One that makes an egregious error, but that can be easily corrected? Like, say, this: On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer Much have I travell’d in the realms of gold, … Continue reading

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in verse #39 : the lost leader

I raised the issue in my last post of the political and economic forces driving Romantic poetry, citing Roger Sales, who argues that in the Romantic authors we find apologists for the destruction of English rural life.[i]  Jonathan Langford, in … Continue reading

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in verse #38 : Greek to me

Alexander Pope, born in 1688, dead in his 56th year, commonly viewed as the last great neo-classicist, could also be viewed as the first of the Romantics — because of his sincerity.  As Aubrey Williams has it:  “Pope’s poetry can … Continue reading

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in verse #36 : For I will consider Christopher Smart

Anyone might consider him smart, for that matter.  He was well educated in Greek and Latin as a schoolboy, attended Pembroke College, Cambridge, earned many scholarships (most for scholarship), was widely published both as a poet and as an essayist, … Continue reading

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in verse #35 : Blake our guide

Dante chose as his guide through Hell and Purgatory his great predecessor Virgil, the greatest of the Latin epic poets.  But when he came to the gates of Heaven, Virgil could not enter, and the pure Beatrice became his guide … Continue reading

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in verse # 34 : a different Blake

If William Blake is the father of contemporary American free verse, Emily Dickinson is surely its mother.  But hold on, I hear you say, wasn’t that father Walt Whitman?  Well, maybe he was the godfather.  And I am aware of … Continue reading

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Second Anniversary of Fire in the Pasture

. This month, Tyler Chadwick‘s masterfully constructed anthology—unquestionably the finest poetry anthology in, like, ever.* Besides his stellar work as editor, you have the complicated but beautiful book design by Elizabeth Beeton, the now iconic cover painting by Casey Jex Smith, … Continue reading

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in verse # 33 : a Blake vision

William Blake was perfectly capable of writing rhyming verse; it can and has been set to music.  Here is the text of an anthem known as “Jerusalem,” written by Blake around 1804 and set to music by Sir Hubert Parry … Continue reading

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