Category Archives: Storytelling and Community

The Power of Not Preaching

When one says the word “religion,” there are a number of images and ideas that come to mind. One of the strongest, complete with positive and negative implications, is preaching. To those who don’t align themselves with an organized religion, just … Continue reading

Posted in On-screen, On-stage, Storytelling and Community | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Waiting for the Mormon Serial

A couple of weeks back I did something I’m awfully good at: I stuck my foot in my mouth. A friend had posted a link on Facebook to a T-shirt designed by another friend. A black shirt that read in … Continue reading

Posted in Electronic Age, On-stage, Storytelling and Community | 4 Comments

A Conference Matching Game

Another General Conference has ended and I’m in the mode of poring over the paper copy of addresses. I’m reading the inspiring messages and oohing and ahhing over the photo shots. It’s been a long time since my mother made … Continue reading

Posted in Storytelling and Community | Tagged | 4 Comments

Do we have art that responds to Recent Events?

. The other night I followed a link to a blog I hadn’t been to in years, Mormon Child Bride. Although it looks much as it ever did, since I was last there, it has changed from a more knowing … Continue reading

Posted in Storytelling and Community | Tagged , | 7 Comments

Moving Culture

At this year’s Association for Mormon Letters conference I had the opportunity to participate in a panel discussion on teaching Mormon literature with Margaret Blair Young, Shelah Miner, and Boyd Petersen. Among the items we discussed at length was the … Continue reading

Posted in Mormon LitCrit, Storytelling and Community | Tagged , , | 20 Comments

But Is It Mormon Enough?

Any time you form a group and attempt to facilitate discussions of interest to that group, one of the first questions is where to draw the lines to distinguish what we are/do from what other people are/do. What’s our communal identity? How do we differentiate? Beyond what we choose to embrace, what do we choose not to discuss?

Part I of an extended meander triggered by a misreading, supported by a misremembering, and reflecting an outsider’s view on a fundamental question of Mormon criticism that took the long way around to dovetail with the more traditional academic view. Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, Mormon LitCrit, Storytelling and Community | 5 Comments