Category Archives: Community Voices

Positioning AML: Guest Post by William Morris

(Administrator note: This guest post by William has been in the queue for a while, so I’m taking the opportunity to post it now. I hope we can use it to continue/restart the flourishing conversation about the future of AML … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices | Tagged , | 43 Comments

The Future of AML: Part One of Numerous

Theric’s recent post led to an outpouring (120 comments and counting) of ideas and speculation on the future of AML, how to get there, and who will take it there. I noted that I would try to assemble said gush of … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices | 75 Comments

Accountability to the little guy

. This blog was down for several days this month because someone forgot to pay for the domain name or hosting or something rudimentary like that. The accompanying website has been down for a long time for reasons unclarified. I … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices | Tagged | 132 Comments

YA Corner: Lavina’s Library

The much beloved building didn’t look like much on the outside. The structure was old, a remnant of early mining days. It was one story with a façade front, making it look a lot more substantial. It had been painted … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, YA corner | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

The Sacred and the Profane

As Mormons we are a missionary people. We are specifically enjoined to share both intellectual knowledge and more intimate understandings of spiritual things. So how do we share the thoughts of our heads and the understandings of our hearts without trampling the sacred? How do we come to understand those things unless we consider them with sometimes brutal intensity? Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, General | 4 Comments

Mormon Enough? I’m Relieved to Discover…

I believe the tendency to reduce and exclude, to narrow definitions to simple, direct memes has its uses. In criticizing literature by Mormons or for Mormon audiences, Mormon critics must necessarily categorize and differentiate which shelves should carry which stories. Readers deserve to know.

But I think we do ourselves a disservice if we dismiss as irrelevant those works by self-described Mormon authors that are not told in culturally Mormon forms and terms. Because it is precisely these subconsciously Mormon tales that can reveal deep Mormonism to those audiences most capable of understanding those themes. Not better than more overt tales, but just as deserving of our thoughtful criticism. It would be a shame to institutionally dismiss what could be some of our most deeply Mormon works because that Mormonness was not obvious enough. Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, General, Mormon LitCrit, SF&F corner, The Populist's Soapbox | 4 Comments

YA Corner: Things I Want My Daughter to Know About Marriage

Emma received a marriage proposal on Christmas Eve. Actually on the stroke of midnight, exactly between the “Eve” and Christmas Day. That is what they told us and there is a Facebook photo with a clock on the wall to … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, YA corner | Tagged , | 4 Comments

Orson Scott Card: Mormon Literary Pioneer

Quick: What author has arguably done more than any other to explore multiple ways of being Mormon, across multiple genres and audiences? Answer: Orson Scott Card. Which you already knew, because you read the title of this column. It’s a … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, Mormon LitCrit, SF&F corner | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Six Future Discoveries LDS Doctrine May Have to Handle

I’ve long thought that one of the advantages of having a church guided by modern revelation is that we Latter-day Saints don’t have to rely on finding ways to apply scriptural passages to technological developments in order to determine whether … Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, SF&F corner | 30 Comments

But Is It Mormon Enough?

Any time you form a group and attempt to facilitate discussions of interest to that group, one of the first questions is where to draw the lines to distinguish what we are/do from what other people are/do. What’s our communal identity? How do we differentiate? Beyond what we choose to embrace, what do we choose not to discuss?

Part I of an extended meander triggered by a misreading, supported by a misremembering, and reflecting an outsider’s view on a fundamental question of Mormon criticism that took the long way around to dovetail with the more traditional academic view. Continue reading

Posted in Community Voices, Mormon LitCrit, Storytelling and Community | 5 Comments